Yonge and Dundas, Toronto, 1985

Yonge and Dundas, Toronto, 1985

I’ve been interested in self portraits since I first saw some Lee Friedlander selfies in 1978. I like how he placed himself in the photo with a kind of deadpan humour and the way he used various reflections and shadows. … Continue reading

Toronto Flashback (1980-1986) – photos by Avard Woolaver

Toronto Flashback (1980-1986) – photos by Avard Woolaver

A promo by Samuel J. Zachs Gallery in Toronto featuring a selection of photos from the book Toronto Flashback (1980-1986). http://www.zacksgallery.ca/avard-woolaver.html “Photographer Avard Woolaver moved to Toronto in 1980 to study photography at Ryerson University. During his transition from rural Nova … Continue reading

Poetry is like the latent image

Poetry is like the latent image

In analog photography, the image is invisible and remains hidden on the film until it magically appears during development. Poetry can remain in our minds like a latent image. Here is a poem I wrote about this phenomenon.   Latent … Continue reading

3 insights gained in my early days of photography

3 insights gained in my early days of photography

Whenever you begin something new, you tend to learn a lot in a short time. Here are 3 insights I gained in my earliest years of photography: I learned to expect the unexpected. Things sometimes happen quickly when we are composing a … Continue reading

Dundas West and Keele, Toronto, 1983

Dundas West and Keele, Toronto, 1983

from the series: Toronto Days   Documenting Toronto in the 1980s and 1990s, in my younger days—Be sure to check out my new blog: The Image Journey http://www.avardwoolaver.com/ Posted by Avard Woolaver Photography on Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Everyday Objects in the Democratic Forest

Everyday Objects in the Democratic Forest

Photographer Willliam Eggleston is known for legitimizing colour photography as art. His photos are a visual treat without clichés—no sunsets, no lighthouses. Instead, he has ordinary scenes and everyday objects—things that we mostly pass by without notice. As Eudora Welty says … Continue reading